DFID pledges to spend aid budget more effectively

The UK’s Department of International Development (DfID) is planning to spend the aid budget more effectively.

DfID’s Penny Mordaunt reiterated the government’s commitment to the 0.7 percent of GDP target, but stressed that the UK taxpayer expected better value for money on foreign aid.

Speaking at Chatham House’s London Conference, the Secretary of State told the crowd that: “we need to ensure that how we are meeting the 0.7 percent is sensible and works for the British public in the long-term, so we are focused on ensuring there is nothing that hinders the most effective use of these funds.”

It comes after DfID faced widespread condemnation for frivolous spending on Western consultants with some receiving the equivalent of £600 a day rather than on frontline assistance, or spending £9 million on an an Ethiopian ‘Spice Girls‘.

For Mordaunt, Britain’s role should be to fund projects which developing countries are unable to do themselves. It is essential to “build capacity” in these countries, such as energy, to ensure that these countries can create their own economic growth. That is why the construction of large-scale power plants are vital for development, with experts asserting that just one would create up to 800,000 jobs. That is why Japan, China and South Korea are all building fossil fuel power stations in some of the world’s poorest countries.

If the UK Government is serious about improving how it spends public money, it must be prepared to use the aid budget on large-scale infrastructure projects. Investing in energy capacity is one of the easiest ways to ensure that developing countries can stand on their two feet without assistance from the UK taxpayer.