Mini-grids will not power Africa alone by 2030

Mini-grids will not power Africa alone by 2030

Powering Africa and the developing world is a worldwide priority for developed countries and mini-grids are a suitable option for the most remote parts of the continent. However, mini-grids alone will not bring light and prosperity to all Africans.

The Africa Mini-grid Developers Association (AMDA) are in the process of launching a project to help up-scale mini grid projects across Africa. They require over $187 billion between now and 2030 to help reach universal energy access to electricity. In addition to this, the International Energy Agency has said that a separate amount of $391 billion will be required to fund on-grid technology alongside off-grid.

Off-grid technology is important to the future of the continent, but at such an expense it ought to be reconsidered as it will account for 48% of the total needed to invest in Africa to reach universal access by 2030.

Currently 600 million sub-Saharan Africans – two-thirds of the entire population – are without any form of electricity. Both on-grid and off-grid investment is needed but should it be at such an expense in the form of unreliable and costly renewable technology?

There is a general consensus agreed by the United Nations and 193 countries that every nation should reach universal energy access by 2030, but it is unlikely to be achieved in sub-Sahara Africa by this time.

India is an example of a country that has focused on universal energy access by using natural resources, prioritising giving electricity to all of its citizens before looking into alternative renewable technology. This has ensured that India is now on the cusp of achieving 100% access for all of its citizens in the next few years, way before the 2030 ambition.

Countries across Africa need to follow India and focus on promoting all forms of energy, both on and off-grid. However, it is vital that it is done in a way that does not mean a huge expense for relatively little reward in terms of energy generation.

African countries should prioritise the natural resources that each country harnesses and produce enough electricity so that their citizens can cook their dinner, read a book, walk the streets at night, enjoy their education, and so that they can run their own businesses. By improving energy access, you improve the economy of developing countries, and the lives of all of their citizens.